Millennium Plaques

Trip Advisor

 

 

Bronze Age Boat Plaque


Bronze Age Boat Plaque


To commemorate the Millennium,the Dover Society have installed around the town twelve plaques that mark historic links with events and people from by-gone days.

Walk One

We suggest you start your walk along the trail at the underpass that runs under the A20 from Bench Street. It was here that the celebrated 3,600 year old Bronze Age Boat was discovered in 1992 during road contruction work.

1 Dover Society Plaque - Bronze Age Boat Plaque. Dover Society, Bench Street.
(photograph Alan Sencicle 2009 )
As you stroll through the underpass towards the sea front have a look at the murals showing the progress in cross-Channel travel over the centuries.
Once out of the underpass turn left into Camden Crescent and see the second plaque recalling that Charles Dickens and his family used to lodge here and where he was visited by fellow writer Wilkie Collins. The actual house was destroyed by enemy action in 1939 - 45 war.

 

 

 

2  Dover Society Plaque - Charles Dickens, Camden Crescent. Alan Sencicle 2009

2 Dover Society Plaque - Charles Dickens, Camden Crescent.
( Alan Sencicle 2009 )
Now walk on to the sea front where a prize winning sculpture, entitled Crest of the Wave, depicts two swimmers. Turn right and walk along the promenade, past other monuments recalling Dover's Hell Fire Corner days.
At the far end of the promenade there's a momument commemorating the arival on our shores of Charles II on the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660.

 

 

 

Jarrett Clifford - Memorial, Prince of Wales Pier, presented by Dover Society.


Jarrett Clifford - Memorial, Prince of Wales Pier, presented by Dover Society.

( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)
Turn right and cross the swing bridge, noticing the Dover Lifeboat Station on your left and the yachts in both the Wellington and the Granville Docks. On reaching Snargate Street ( the A20 ) turn left, cross a bridge over the railway, then over a viaduct to Lord Warden Square.
Here is the former Lord Warden Hotel, now used for offices. The Hotel once hosted Royalty, nobles, diplomats, and writers including Dickens and Thackery, while they waited to cross the Channel. Here is plaque number three recalling the arrival of Napoleon III Emperor of the French, when he arrived at Dover to go into exile. 3 Dover Society Plaque

 

 

 

on Southern House formerly the Lord Warden Hotel.


on Southern House formerly the Lord Warden Hotel.

( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)

Now retrace your steps, back over the viaduct and along Snargate Street.
Notice the Grand Shaft, a triple staircase through the cliffs to the Western Heights above, constructed in Napoleonic War days to provide speedy access for troops from their barracks above to the shoreline.
Towards the end of Snargate see plaque number four. It was near this spot where the Yorke family lived and whose son went on to become Lord Chancellor.
Dover Society Plaque

 

 

 

Philip Yorke,York Street.


Philip Yorke,York Street.
( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)

Now cross dual carriageway York Street and walk to the town's Market Square where Dover museum is situated, for the start of walk two.
The Market Square makes a conveient spot to set off on the second walk.
On the exterior wall of the museum notice plaque number five commemorating the Raid on the German-occupied Belgium port of Zeebrugge by the British on St George's Day 1918. The Royal Navy ships had sailed from Dover and when they returned they brought back the bodies of many sailors and Royal Marines. These were placed in a temporary mortuary in what was a covered market ( now Dover Museum ) before honourable burial at St.James'cemetery, Dover.

 

 

 

Market Hall Zeebrugge Raid.


Market Hall Zeebrugge Raid.
( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)
While in the Market Square take a look at the plaque, number six, on the side wall of Barclays' Bank, recalling the cruel days when minor criminals were punished at this spot. Here were the town's stocks and pillory.

 

 

 

Punishment Market Lane


Punishment Market Lane
( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)
Cross the Market Square, past the fountaine, to Castle Street with its excellent view of Dover Castle. Here, on the wall of the Loyd's TSB, is Dover Society plaque number seven

 

 

 

Last  Enemy Shell of WWII, Castle Street.


Last Enemy Shell of WWII, Castle Street. 1910

( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)

Dover Society Plaque

 

 

 William Burgess, Stembrook.


William Burgess, Stembrook.
( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)
Go right of St Mary's Church and on the hall Dover Society Plaque

 

 

Thomas Pattenden diarist 1748-1819 buried in St Mary's Churchyard. LS2010


Thomas Pattenden diarist 1748-1819 buried in St Mary's Churchyard. LS2010

Video

More about Thomas Pattenden

Head up the high Street to Dover Town Hall to find the Dover Society Zeebrugge Bell Plaque.

 

 

Zeebrugge Bell Plaque, Town Hall


Zeebrugge Bell Plaque, Town Hall

( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)

Even further up the High Street on the wall of the Eagle Public House. Dover's Honorary Recorder, Judge Andrew Patience QC, broke away from official Cinque Ports' duties on Saturday to unveil the plaque which is on the outside wall of The Eagle public house and it recalls it was near that spot where Dover hanged its criminals in the 18th and early 19th century.

 

 

Gallows bottom of Tower Hamlets Road unvieled


Society chairman Terry Sutton welcomed those present who included Dover's mayor, Councillor Mrs Diane Smallwood, who was also Speaker of the Cinque Ports.
 

 

 

Gallows bottom of Tower Hamlets Road unvieled

Judge Patience explained the hanging on the gallows was supposed to have a moral effect on the rest of the population, until public executions ended with the Municipal Reform Act of 1834.

The ten plaques, marking historic buildings or events in Dover, have been provided as The Dover Society's contribution to the Millennium celebrations.

 

 

Gallows bottom of Tower Hamlets Road. ( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)


Gallows bottom of Tower Hamlets Road. ( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)

Head towards the Castle, turn right into Maison Dieu Road and walk down to St Paul's Church.
The first road left is Taswell Street where you will find the last Dover Society Plaque

 

 

First Aerial Bomb, Taswell Street. ( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)


First Aerial Bomb, Taswell Street. ( photograph Alan Sencicle 2009)

Return to Maison Dieu Road, turn left and you will pass a school playing field which was St James Church.

 

On Thursday 29th January 2015 a new plaque by the Dover Society was put up to recall the River Tram Crash on 19th August 1917

( photograph Alan Sencicle 2015)

 

photograph by Alan Sencicle

photograph by Alan Sencicle

 

 

The Dover Society marked the anniversary of 

 

Crabble Tram Accident  – 19 August 1917

 

 on Saturday 19the August 2017

 

at Crabble Corn Mill. 

 

Dover Tales told the story of this tragedy

THE WORST TRAM ACCIDENT IN BRITAIN

with words and music set within its First World War context.

 

A wreath was laid below the plaque by David Bissenden, the tram driver's grandson.