Dover Harbour

 

 

Busy Promenade on regatta day


Busy Promenade on regatta day
 


DISCOVERY OF THE REMAINS OF AN OLD PIER IN DOVER HARBOUR

 

During the past week the workmen in the employ of the harbour authorities have been engaged in removing the remains of an ancient pier, which have been discovered in the interior of the harbour, near what is termed the Hardway, where vessels at low tide undergo repair. By the position of the wooden piles and stonework - the upper extremities of which have been unexpectedly exposed to view by the action of the recent easterly gales, having stripped the vicinity of the Hardway of a large portion of the shingle accumulated there - the pier must have been buried for several centuries under the quay which for many years was the site of the old Dover Castle Hotel and the Government store houses, and which were removed four or five years ago to make way for the recent enlargement of the harbour.
(Illustrated London News, Saturday October 27 1849 page 285 issue 396)


AERIAL ROPEWAY to Dover Harbour from Tilmanstone Colliery.

British Ropeway Engineering Co Ltd (Breco for short), of Sevenoaks, Kent installed a monocable aerial ropeway between Tilmanstone Colliery and Dover Harbour in the late 1920s, to carry coal from the pit to a massive bunker built on the Eastern Arm. This picture, taken from the clifftop overlooking Dover harbour, shows the point where the ropeway reached a tunnel, cut through the cliffs, to take the tubs of coal down to the Eastern Arm. There the line continued along the pier to a massive bunker built for the colliery owners. It could then be loaded into ships for transport to other ports or used for bunkering cross-Channel ferries, saving the cost of rail transport. Although there was an East Kent Railway line link from the colliery to Shepherdswell main line station on the London to Dover railway, colliery owners believed the railways were over-charging them and that's why they built the ropeway.

The first section of the line, to a 'driving' station at East Langdon, near Whitfield, was opened on October 1929 by local building contractor's wife, Mrs R.J. Barwick who saw the first tubs of coal arriving on the overhead ropeway from the colliery. Each carried 15 cwt of coal. Power was provided by a 200hp steam engine plant. The coal could go no further at that stage because the cable had not been laid all the way to Dover. Work was still being carried out on boring two tunnels through the cliffs down to the Eastern Arm to complete this, the longest ropeway in the country.

DOVER HUMANE AND SHIPWRECK INSTITUTION - proposal for lifeboat house:
“since the establishment of the institution in September last rewards had been given for the rescue of eight persons from the water whose lives, with one exception, had been preserved... The lifeboat was confided to a committee of the Fellowship of Pilots who had kindly undertaken to test her qualities... It was also proposed that a permanent boat station should be provided... Application made to the Harbour Board for leave to erect a practicable boathouse adjoining that of the Customs, the expense for which was estimated at about £55... A reward of one sovereign was given to William Johnson, master of a fishing smack for jumping into the water and saving the life of a boy ...”
(Dover Telegraph September 15, 1838 page 8 column 2) Dover Humane and Shipwreck Institution

CAPTURED by CUSTOMS:
“Capt Watts of His Majesty's sloop Osprey yesterday sent into this port a lugger with about 400 half ankers of spirits being the third lugger the Osprey has captured within a short time - another lugger, with upwards of 800 half ankers is likewise sent into this port by Capt Benjamin Worthington of the Tartar Custom House cutter which he captured after a chase of 24 hours.” (Kentish Gazette, September 4th 1798, page 4, column 4, under Dover) Captured by Customs HARBOUR: One of Her Majesty's Surveying Vessels has been off this harbour today putting down buoys and flags near the mouth, but at present we have not heard the particular object in view.”
(Kentish Gazette 26 Nov 1839 p.3 col.1)

LIFE BOAT STATION:

The Dover Humane Society are building a house for the joint purpose of being a station for their Life Boat and apparatus, as well as a receiving house, which is erecting in the Bay near the York Hotel, a most eligible site ” (Kentish Gazette 22 Jan 1839 p.4 col.4)
Complaints re imports into Dover:

Many complaints having been made by the tradespeople of this port(Dover) against the intrusion of French bread, flour, beef, pork and other provisions, brought in the passage vessels from France, and which has of late prevailed to such an extent as to be particularly injurious to the trade in general. Strict orders have been issued at the Customs House to seize all articles of this description as they are prohibited, to be imported. We notice in our paper of the 22nd ult that a considerable quantity of tea had been seized on board the French vessel “Charles”. Since which the best vigilance has been exerted to prevent this illicit importation of this commodity, with such good effect that the Licensed Tea Dealers have very considerably increased their sale as is fully proved by their returns to the Excise office. (Cinque Ports Herald 26 Feb 1826 p.3 col.3)
Dover Harbour Work in 1580s:
Robert STICKELLS (died 1620) Appearing to be a mason by trade, the surviving records show him to have been acting as an architect, clerk of works and naval engineer. In the 1580s he was one of the “masters of the work” then in progress at Dover Harbour, his main task being raising rocks by barrel and chains and floating them to a jetty in the process of construction. Stow's “Chronicle” records that in 1595, “master Stickells the excellent architect of our time” constructed a small pinnace that could be taken to pieces and reassembled. This was launched in Tower dock “but there came no good of it.” In 1595 the Earl of Derby recommended Stickells as a candidate for the Surveyorship of the Queen's Works. In fact he had to make do with a subordinate clerkship of the works, which he held from 1597-8 until his death. From 1598-9 he was stationed at Richmond, where in 1605-6 he designed a new lodge in the park of which survive drawings. He died in May 1620. In his will be describes himself as “a citizen and freemason of London” living in the parish of St Olave, Southwark.” (from “A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600-1840 by Howard Colvin)“ Importation of French Leather: “the Cordwainers residing in Dovor having been for a considerable time much injured in their trade, by the daily importation of French leather, boots and shoes, without payment of the duty did, a short time since, petition the House of Commons thereon, and the petitioners have since received the advice and support of both the Members for their Port; and on Wednesday last a numerous meeting of the trade took place, when it was determined to take immediate measures against those who have been guilty of the illicit practice.” (Kentish Gazette 13 April 1821 - “local news”)
'Tartar' Cutter : “On 29 ultimo was seized in Grainthorpe Haven in the county of Lincoln, by Mr RICHARDSON, Officer of Excise, at Saltfleet, and Messrs SANDERSON and WARD, Custom House Officers, a new cutter called the “Tartar” of Dover, with 200 half ankers of foreign geneva and brandy on board which were safely conveyed to Boston the Thursday following.”
( Kentish Gazette 23-26 Feb 1788 back page col.3)
From Thomas Pattenden's Diary:

“Thurs 26 July 1798 Revd Mr Lyon called on me this afternoon and brought me some plans of the ancient Harbour at Dover, first about the year 1533, tempo.” Henry 8th when the work was begun with stones and timber to run out - rods into the sea to break off the force of the S.W. wind but the expence was so great it was never finished, this work is what we now call the mole rocks just seen from the Pier head at low water. I drew the first plan this afternoon.
Fri 27 July 1798 this afternoon began the second plan of the harbour but had not time to finish it.
Sat 28 July 1798 Finished the second plan of the harbour. Mr Lyon called in and brought me a third."

British Ropeway Engineering Co Ltd (Breco for short), of Sevenoaks, Kent installed a monocable aerial ropeway between Tilmanstone Colliery and Dover Harbour in the late 1920s, to carry coal from the pit to a massive bunker built on the Eastern Arm. This picture, taken from the clifftop overlooking Dover harbour, shows the point where the ropeway reached a tunnel, cut through the cliffs, to take the tubs of coal down to the Eastern Arm. There the line continued along the pier to a massive bunker built for the colliery owners. It could then be loaded into ships for transport to other ports or used for bunkering cross-Channel ferries, saving the cost of rail transport. Although there was an East Kent Railway line link from the colliery to Shepherdswell main line station on the London to Dover railway, colliery owners believed the railways were over-charging them and that's why they built the ropeway. The first section of the line, to a 'driving' station at East Langdon, near Whitfield, was opened on October 1929 by local building contractor's wife, Mrs R.J. Barwick who saw the first tubs of coal arriving on the overhead ropeway from the colliery. Each carried 15 cwt of coal. Power was provided by a 200hp steam engine plant. The coal could go no further at that stage because the cable had not been laid all the way to Dover. Work was still being carried out on boring two tunnels through the cliffs down to the Eastern Arm to complete this, the longest ropeway in the country.

AERIAL ROPEWAY to Dover Harbour from Tilmanstone Colliery. Longest Aerial ropeway Piers of Dover TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION At the SWAN in Dover on Tuesday 12th May 1801, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, 34 small casks salted herrings
104 ditto (small casks) salted codfish pickled
3 ditto (small casks) 'blue' for starching linen 60 deals 16-feet long 1 ½ inches thick
1 box salted codfish part of the cargo of the hoy “Stadt Emden”, St Hendricks, Master. For particulars enquire of Messrs Fector & Minet, Dover (Kentish Gazette Tuesday May 5th 1801 front page col.3)
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the York Hotel in Dover on Thursday the 26 February inst, at 11 o'clock by virtue of a commission from the High Court of Admiralty - About 100 chests; and 100 half chests Lemons, duty-free, being part of the cargo of the Swedish galliot “Aurora”, detained on her voyage from Malaga to Altona, by His Majesty's Armed Cutter “Cygnet”, Lt. P.R. Minster, Commander. The lemons to be seen the day before and the morning of the sale by applying to Messrs. Latham Rice and Co., Dover of whom catalogues may be had. (Kentish Gazette 13 February 1801 front page col.4) TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION At the York Hotel in Dover on Thursday 3 September 1807 at 12 o'clock; Three chests containing 226 reams post paper 11 bottles preserved fruit in spirits; 11 pots marmalade - 6 bottles olives 5 bottles anchovies - 5 ditto cordials Also about a ton of Spanish cork. For particulars apply at the office of Messrs Fector & Minet (Kentish Gazette 1 Sept 1807 page 1 col.3) TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION At the York Hotel in Dover on Thursday 3 September 1807 at 11 o'clock 100 Casks about 65-tons currants duty paid 228 bales juniper berries, duty paid 18 cases dried sweetmeats, duty paid being the entire cargo of the American schooner “CHARLES”, Wm Parsons master, detained as prize on a voyage from Leghorn to Copenhagen and condemned to His Majesty's gun-brig 'TURBULENT', Lt. J.G. Nops, Commander. And - Immediately after will be sold: About 150-tons Salt, For EXPORTATION being entire the cargo of the Danish brig “NEPTUNUS”, A.Solling, master, detained as prize on a voyage from Lower Rochelle to Larwick and condemned to His Majesty's gun brig “ PINC...” Lt. Aberdour, Commander. The goods to be seen and catalogues to be had, 3 days before the sale, by applying to Latham Rice and Co. (Kentish Gazette 1 Sept 1807 page 1 col.3)
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the Custom-House, Dover on Thursday 3rd September 1807 at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, in sundry lots, viz: For home consumption: 300-lbs Black Tea; 132-lbs Salt; 153-lbs Moist Sugar; 60-lbs Tamarinds; 62 pieces Ital.Black Crepe;
18 Cornelian Ornaments;
2 Wood Fans; Two pieces of 12 and three quarter yards East India worked muslin; And other articles Which may be viewed on the morning of the day of sale. A deposit of £25% will be required. (Kentish Gazette 1 Sept 1807 page 1 col.3) Dover Harbour Bill carried - of vast importance to Dover “The Dover Harbour Bill has received the Royal Assent, its object we understand is to restore the duty which was taken from the Harbour many years ago and appropriated to Rye Harbour. The bill was warmly opposed in a committee of the House of Commons by the shipowners of London, but after a full investigation of evidence as to its general utility, was carried by a large majority. - The measure is of vast importance to the town of Dover, as it will more than double the harbour revenue, and enable the commissioners to carry into execution very extensive improvements by which the trade of the town will be considerably increased and the shipping interests greatly benefited.” (Kentish Gazette 11 Aug 1807 back page col.4) Dover Harbour Bill Flag of Truce 1807 Dover, July 30th: An American brig with a flag of truce flying, arrived off here yesterday, bound from the West Indies to Holland, with Dutch soldiers on board from Curacoa; she brought up in the roads being very much in want of provisions, but was detained by the Customhouse boats, and sent into the Harbour in consequence of the imbargo. There is a lieutenant and 29 privates on board, mostly old men. A guard is placed over them and all communication with the shore is prohibited. (Kentish Gazette 1807 28 July back page, col.3)
SALES of WINES and BRANDIES

To be sold by auction, On Thursday 20 instant at the Dover Castle Inn, in Dover, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, for the payment of salvage and expenses and by permission of the Hon. The Commissioners of the Customs, either for home consumption (on payment of the import duties) or for exportation at the option of the purchasers 252 casks of wine of various sizes and qualities and 2 large casks of spirits of Brandy saved from the cargo of the Brig ”Marie Anne“, Captain J.C.Domstricht, wrecked near Dungeness 29 Nov last on a voyage from Cette, bound to Harvre de Grace. Samples may be tasted and catalogues had on application to Messrs. FECTOR & Co., two days previous to the sale.” (Dover Telegraph April 15 1837 p.8 col.1)
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the SWAN in Dover on Tuesday 12th May 1801, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, 34 small casks salted herrings 104 ditto (small casks) salted codfish pickled 3 ditto (small casks) 'blue' for starching linen 60 deals 16-feet long 1 ½ inches thick 1 box salted codfish part of the cargo of the hoy “Stadt Emden”, St Hendricks, Master. For particulars enquire of Messrs Fector & Minet, Dover (Kentish Gazette Tuesday May 5th 1801 front page col.3)
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the York Hotel in Dover on Thursday the 26 February inst, at 11 o'clock by virtue of a commission from the High Court of Admiralty - About 100 chests; and 100 half chests Lemons, duty-free, being part of the cargo of the Swedish galliot “Aurora”, detained on her voyage from Malaga to Altona, by His Majesty's Armed Cutter “Cygnet”, Lt. P.R. Minster, Commander. The lemons to be seen the day before and the morning of the sale by applying to Messrs. Latham Rice and Co., Dover of whom catalogues may be had. (Kentish Gazette 13 February 1801 front page col.4)
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the York Hotel in Dover on Thursday 3 September 1807 at 12 o'clock; Three chests containing 226 reams post paper 11 bottles preserved fruit in spirits; 11 pots marmalade - 6 bottles olives 5 bottles anchovies - 5 ditto cordials Also about a ton of Spanish cork. For particulars apply at the office of Messrs Fector & Minet (Kentish Gazette 1 Sept 1807 page 1 col.3)
TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the York Hotel in Dover on Thursday 3 September 1807 at 11 o'clock 100 Casks about 65-tons currants duty paid 228 bales juniper berries, duty paid 18 cases dried sweetmeats, duty paid being the entire cargo of the American schooner “CHARLES”, Wm Parsons master, detained as prize on a voyage from Leghorn to Copenhagen and condemned to His Majesty's gun-brig “TURBULENT”, Lt. J.G. Nops, Commander. And - Immediately after will be sold: About 150-tons Salt, For EXPORTATION being entire the cargo of the Danish brig “NEPTUNUS”, A.Solling, master, detained as prize on a voyage from Lower Rochelle to Larwick and condemned to His Majesty's gun brig “PINC...”Lt. Aberdour, Commander. The goods to be seen and catalogues to be had, 3 days before the sale, by applying to Latham Rice and Co. (Kentish Gazette 1 Sept 1807 page 1 col.3)

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

At the Custom-House, Dover on Thursday 3rd September 1807 at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, in sundry lots, viz: For home consumption: 300-lbs Black Tea; 132-lbs Salt; 153-lbs Moist Sugar; 60-lbs Tamarinds; 62 pieces Ital.Black Crepe; 18 Cornelian Ornaments; 2 Wood Fans; Two pieces of 12 and three quarter yards East India worked muslin; And other articles Which may be viewed on the morning of the day of sale. A deposit of £25% will be required. (Kentish Gazette 1 Sept 1807 page 1 col.3) Dover Harbour Bill carried - of vast importance to Dover “The Dover Harbour Bill has received the Royal Assent, its object we understand is to restore the duty which was taken from the Harbour many years ago and appropriated to Rye Harbour. The bill was warmly opposed in a committee of the House of Commons by the shipowners of London, but after a full investigation of evidence as to its general utility, was carried by a large majority. - The measure is of vast importance to the town of Dover, as it will more than double the harbour revenue, and enable the commissioners to carry into execution very extensive improvements by which the trade of the town will be considerably increased and the shipping interests greatly benefited.”
(Kentish Gazette 11 Aug 1807 back page col.4)

 
Dover Harbour Bill
Flag of Truce 1807
Dover, July 30th: An American brig with a flag of truce flying, arrived off here yesterday, bound from the West Indies to Holland, with Dutch soldiers on board from Curacoa; she brought up in the roads being very much in want of provisions, but was detained by the Customhouse boats, and sent into the Harbour in consequence of the imbargo. There is a lieutenant and 29 privates on board, mostly old men. A guard is placed over them and all communication with the shore is prohibited.
(Kentish Gazette 1807 28 July back page, col.3)

 

 

Piers of Dover