Dover Streets N - Z

N-Z OF DOVER’S STREETS, ANCIENT AND MODERN
 

Napier Road ran from Auckland Crescent to Hobart Crescen. The obvious, but incorrect, reason for this name is that David Napier was the owner of ‘Rob Roy,’ the first steam vessel on the cross Channel service in 1820. In fact it is named after the New Zealand city devastated by an earthquake in 1931. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Natal Road is off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Nevada Lane is off Winant Way, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.


New Bridge is now pedestrianised from Townwall Street to Marine Parade. The actual bridge over the Dour was built in 1800 on the site of the medieval Severus Gate, demolished in 1762, above which was a chamber in the 14th and 15th centuries used by the King’s Customer who collected import and export duties. It was probably called ‘New’ to differentiate it from the old Buggin’s Bridge a little further up stream. A Custom House was built on the site in Elizabethan times with a platform and battery which became the Three Gun Battery. The new bridge provided a route from Bench Street to the North and Amherst batteries as well as to the Ropewalk on the shingle and Finnis’s timber yard where Camden Crescent and Cambridge Terrace were later built. New Bridge was widened for housing in 1836/40. The National Provincial Bank which had taken over, in 1842, Minet and Fector’s bank dating from 1686, built their Dover premises here which were occupied later by the Dover Harbour Board before it moved to Waterloo Crescent. 


New Hampshire Way was off Winant Way, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

New Street runs from Biggin Street to York Street. Called Turne-Againe-Lane in a 1540 charter, it was renamed when houses were built upon it around 1785. The Paving Commissioners’ minutes describe New Street as ‘lately called Lampers Lane’.

New York Rise was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Newbury Close is off Marlborough Road. It was built in 1966. Both Newbury and Marlborough are towns in Wiltshire.


Nightingale Road runs from Barton Road to Mayfield Avenue. Part of William Crundall’s Barton Estate laid out 1890-1900, it was adopted in 1902.

Noah’s Ark Road runs from the top of Edred Road, Tower Hamlets. This led to a dairy farm of the same name and was developed by the council in 1931. The farm probably obtained its name because it lay under the hill known as Mount Ararat. Following war damage, prefabs were erected in 1948.

Norman Street runs from Priory Road to Effingham Street. It was built on Priory Fields in 1846, which was part of the site of the Norman priory of St. Martin.

North Military Road is a continuation of Military Road to the Western Heights and was built by the military in the 19th century to provide access to the fortifications. 


North Road is off South Road, Tower Hamlets. See Tower Hamlets Road. It is on the 1851 map but was not adopted until 1898.

North Street is a cul de sac off Longfield Road. This was close to a footpath over the Western Heights at North Bastion and was adopted in 1898.

Northampton Street ran from New Bridge to Commercial Quay.  Completed in 1854 and previously known as ‘Up the Pent’, it was named after the Earl of Northampton, Lord Warden in the time of James I who persuaded James in 1606 to take control of the harbour from the town and set up the forerunner of the Harbour Board. Prior to this road being built it was called Pentside and owners of Snargate Street properties could, at high tide, come out of their gardens and get into a boat. The General Post Office was once in this street as was the Sailors’ Bethel and the Wellington Hall, which was a popular public assembly place before the town purchased the Maison Dieu as the town hall. The street was closed in 1950 to provide more quay space.


Northbourne Avenue runs from Astor Avenue to Noah’s Ark Road.  Named after Lord Northbourne, a prominent Conservative and local landowner, by Sir William Crundall when he planned the road early in the 20th century, it was not built upon until 1925 when the corporation built the Astor Avenue Estate.

Oakvale Close is a cul de sac off Chestnut Road. This was built in 1989. The developer of this area was apparently keen on trees for street names.

Odo Road runs from Widred Road to South Road. It was built in 1865. Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, was half brother to William the Conqueror. This powerful man was made Earl of Kent and Constable of Dover Castle. See Tower Hamlets Road.

Oil Mill Lane was off Limekiln Street.

Old Bank Lane was probably by Isaac Minet’s bank in the Pier District and was still there in 1841.


Old Charlton Road is a continuation of Frith Road in Charlton Parish to the Guston boundary.

Old Folkestone Road is a continuation of South Military Road. This was part of an old pack horse track to Folkestone, which became a turnpike road in 1763, but lost its status 20 years later when the new Folkestone Road was opened through Maxton and Farthingloe.

Old Park Avenue runs from London Road to Knight’s Way and takes its name from the Old Park estate upon which it was built. The old mansion was largely rebuilt by Major R. B. Lawes around 1870. This road was adopted in 1908.

Old Park Hill is a continuation of Brookfield Avenue to the town boundary. Adopted in 1923, it takes its name from the Old Park estate upon which it was built. The old mansion was largely rebuilt by Major R. B. Lawes around 1870. This road was adopted in 1908.

Old Park Road runs from Crabble Hill to Brookfield Avenue. Adopted in 1905, it takes its name from the Old Park estate upon which it was built. The old mansion was largely rebuilt by Major R. B. Lawes around 1870. This road was adopted in 1908.


Old Post Office Lane was in the Pier District and was still there in 1841.

Old St. Margaret’s Road.  See Upper Road.

Ontario Way was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Orange Walk  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822. See Liverpool Street.

Oregon Path was off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.


Oswald Place is off Oswald Road. It was built by William Kingsford in 1871 and named after  St. Oswald, King of Northumbria 634-642.

Oswald Road runs from St. Radigund’s Road to Bunker’s Hill. It was built by William Kingsford in 1871 and named after  St. Oswald, King of Northumbria 634-642.

Ottawa Crescent is off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Ottawa Way was off Ottawa Crescent, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It was closed in 1978 for redevelopment.


Over the Wall is included in the 1835 Pier Ward list and in  the 1841 census had just one house. No doubt it took its name from being outside the old town walls.

Oxenden Lane was off Oxenden Street. See Oxenden Street.

Oxenden Street ran from Town Station to Harbour Station. Built by 1841 on land formed when the old Paradise Pent in the Pier District was drained, it was named after Sir Henry Oxenden of Broome Park, an energetic member of the Harbour Board for 44 years who directed harbour improvements from 1791 until 1832. It was demolished in 1923 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Paddock (The) is off Maison Dieu Road. Houses were built in 1886 in what was the paddock of Brook House, built by William Moxon. The private Dover High School was built on one side and was occupied in 1905 by the girls of Dover County School.

Palmerston Terrace was in Charlton Green. Named after Lord Palmerston, Prime Minister and 119th Lord Warden, it was built in 1868 facing the river on Charlton Green.

Paper Alley was off Bridge Street. This was the name given to the first houses built on the north side of Bridge Street soon after1828 even though the nearest paper mill was some distance away. The connection may be that William Kingsford owned the land as well as an oilcake mill at Charlton, a flour mill at Buckland (later called Mannering’s Mill) and a paper millopposite. It was later rebuilt and renamed Paul’s Place.

Paradise Lane was off Paradise Street. See Paradise Street.

Paradise Pent is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822.

Paradise Street ran from Oxenden Street to Round Tower Lane. Built on the site of the original Paradise harbour, it was demolished in 1913 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Pardoner’s Way runs from Pilgrim’s Way to Old Park Hill. Built in 1925, it is one of the post First World War streets on the Buckland Estate that take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Parfitt Way is off Mayfield Avenue. It was built in 1995 and named after Keith Parfitt, an archaeologist with the Canterbury Archaeological Trust that in 1994 excavated an Anglo-Saxon cemetery of 200 graves discovered on this site.

Paris Yard was built on land behind the Paris Hotel near the Grand Shaft and was later renamed St. John’s Place. See St. John’s Place.

Parish Yard off Snargate Street appears in an 1875 directory.

Park Avenue runs from Maison Dieu Road to Connaught Road. Part of the Dover Castle Estate, it leads to Connaught Park, which was opened in 1883 by the Duke and Duchess of Connaught. The road dates from 1885.

Park Mews was off Dour Street and appears in an 1898 directory. See Park Street.

Park Place ran from Ladywell to Dour Street and Park Street. See Park Street.


Park Road runs from Brookfield Avenue to Heathfield Avenue. Adopted in 1935, it presumably takes its name from Old Park. See Old Park Road..

Park Street is a continuation of Ladywell to Five Ways. It was built in 1863 and was to be called Ladywell by the Corporation, but some of the new residents had already had their properties named as Park Street in their title deeds as the road ran beside the boundary wall of Maison Dieu Park. The residents won.


Parson’s Lane is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783

Parson’s Way runs from Pilgrim’s Way to Pardoner’s Way.  It is one of the post WW I streets on the Buckland Estate that take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Paul’s Place is off Bridge Street. In the parish of Charlton, it was built on land long known as Paul’s Corner, possibly named after one of the patron saints of the parish church. See Paper Alley.

Paul’s Street - see Churchill Street.

Paxton’s Lane was in the Pier District and is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783

Pear Tree Lane ran from Adrian Street to Chapel Place.This used to be a continuation of Five Post Lane into Chapel Place known as Above Wall. Apparently a very fine pear tree hung over the wall of a garden at the corner of the lane in Adrian Street. It was demolished when Adrian Street was redeveloped.


Pencester Road runs from Maison Dieu Road to Biggin Street. Stephen de Pencester helped Hubert de Burgh defend Dover Castle against the French in 1216 and became Constable of the Castle. He is buried in the church at Penshurst, his country seat. The road was constructed in 1860 and its bridge in 1863 to connect the town centre with the newly developed Maison Dieu Road. Gunman’s Mansion was demolished to provide entry to Biggin Street.

Pentside is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes in 1778 and was a narrow strip on the landward side of the Pent (which became Wellington Dock in 1846) behind Snargate Street, suitable only for pedestrians. It became Commercial Quay in 1834.

Percival Terrace off Winchelsea Road appears in street directories in the early 1900s.

Perth Way is a path off Auckland Crescent, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Peter Street. Originally called St. Peter’s Street it now runs from High Street to Branch Street. Laid out in 1830 in the parish of Charlton, it was not completely built upon until 1872, according to Bavington Jones. It was named after one of the patron saints of the parish church. The north side of the street was built on part of the site of St. Mary’s Poorhouse, which was closed in 1836 when St. Mary’s Parish joined the River Union And its new workhouse in Buckland Bottom. The street ran originally from High Street to Maison Dieu Road, but part was demolished in 1959 to allow Dover Engineering Works to expand. Only a short stretch remains, from the High Street into modern Branch Street.


Peverell Road is off Rokesley Road. Built in the mid 1960s, it took its name from one of the towers of Dover Castle. William Peverell, Lord of Wrensted, received 14 knights’ fees (grants of land) in return for fighting for the king personally and providing other men. He provided three knights a month for five months a year to help defend the castle.

Phoenix Lane ran from St James’s Street to Dolphin Lane. It was not named until 1879. Presumably it took its name from the adjacent Leney’s brewery. It was closed in 1955.

Piddock’s Lane ran into Strond Street and is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1781.

Pierce’s Court was off Last Lane. This was a small offshoot from Last Lane named after the owner. The first Dover playhouse opened here in 1780, but it transferred to Snargate Street in 1790.

Pierce’s Lane is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1781. This was the name of a local paving contractor and may have been the origin of the name.

Pilgrim’s Way is off London Road, River. Built in 1925, it is one of the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War which all take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Pilgrims Place was in St. Radigund’s Road. This row of old cottages recognised the many pilgrims that must have passed on their way to St. Radigund’s Abbey.

Pilots’ Walk, South Pier is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1797


Pioneer Road is off Crabble Hill. The land was purchased from Mr. Murray Lawes of Old Park by George Solly who laid out the road and according to Terry Sutton said, ‘Let’s call it Pioneer Road since we pioneered it!’

Pleasant Row ran from Durham Hill to Bowling Green Lane. The area was called Mount Pleasant before it became thickly populated in the early 19th century and had a fine view of the bay, castle and surrounding hills. It was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Polhill’s Lane near Ship Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822.

Portland Place ran from Durham Hill to Cowgate Hill. The King Alfred public house was at number 1 in 1800. It was probably named after the third Duke of Portland, a leading Whig politician who became nominal prime minister of a Pitt government in 1807.

Poulton Close is at the top of Coombe Valley Road. This road, adopted in 1973 as part of an industrial estate, is named after the adjoining valley.Poulton was once a parish but now boasts only a farm.

Pretoria Terrace was laid out by Major Lawes soon after the Boer War and named after the town where the Boers surrendered. It was later renamed Brookfield Avenue. See Brookfield Avenue.

Primrose Place is off Primrose Road. See Primrose Road.


Primrose Road is off Coombe Valley Road. It was built in 1865 and named in 1879 after General Primrose who distinguished himself in the Afghan War. The council extended it in 1933/34.

Princes Street once ran from York Street to Queen Street, but now is a short street from Durham Hill to Cowgate Hill. Considering when it was built, it was possibly named after the Prince Regent.

Prioress Walk is a path from Pilgrim’s Way to Shipman’s Way, Buckland Estate. All the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War took their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. This was built in 1932.

Priory Gate Road is off Station Approach. It was built soon after the opening in 1871 of Dover College on the old priory site and was adopted in 1896.

Priory Grove is a cul de sac off Priory Hill. See Priory Hill.

Priory Hill is off High Street.  Several streets leading to or close to the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, now Dover College, use the word Priory. Priory Hill dates from 1881.

Priory Place ran from New Street to Priory Street and is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822. See Priory Road.

Priory Road runs from Biggin Street to Priory Street. Several streets leading to or close to the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, now Dover College, use the word Priory. Previously called Priory Place, Norman Terrace and St. Martin’s Terrace, they were renamed Priory Road in 1872.

Priory Steps run from Priory Gate Road to Priory Hill and Priory Hill to Tower Street (also known as Trafalgar Steps).

Priory Street runs from Biggin Street to Priory Road. Several streets leading to or close to the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, now Dover College use the word Priory. Priory Street dates from 1783 according to a Dover Express article of 1896.

Prospect Place is at the top of Edgar Road  and was built at the same time. It possibly took the name because of the fine prospect from its position on the hill.

Queen Elizabeth Square was in the Pier District. A Methodist chapel was there in 1795. The square was partly demolished to make way for the railway and became known as ‘40 feet road’ until named in 1878.


Queen Elizabeth Street ran from Crosswall to Holy Trinity Parsonage in the Pier District.

Queen Street Lane ran from Queen Street to Tavenor’s Lane and presumably took its name from Queen Street.

Queen Street. It used to run from King Street to Princes Street, but now ends at York Street (from 1972). It was possibly so named because it was the road in the town taken by Elizabeth I in 1573 on arrival from Folkestone after entering the town via Cow Gate. This was probably the greatest pageantry Dover has ever seen with the tail end of the procession still climbing out of Folkestone when the Queen entered Dover. There were a thousand distinguished people on horseback and a thousand wagons each pulled by six horses and 7,000 horses in total.

Queen’s Avenue is off Elms Vale Road. The wife of George V, Queen Mary, is commemorated in this name since the couple were celebrating their Silver Jubilee in 1935 when this road and the adjoining King’s Road were built. It was adopted in 1951.

Queen’s Court was off New Street and was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Queen’s Gardens run from Worthington Street to New Stree. This area was part of the lands of the Maison Dieu and, following the Dissolution, became Crown property. By Elizabeth I’s reign it had become a garden and was probably named after her. Robert Kennet owned the ground in Charles I’s reign when he used it as pasture for his sheep, which were then slaughtered and sold in his Biggin Street shop. The Gunmans of Pencester Road owned it and later, George Dell, a surgeon. W.S.Colyer and Richard Winder leased the ground from William Finnis in 1817 and built two rows of houses on it, retaining the original name.
Randolph Road is off Coombe Valley Road. Lord Randolph Churchill, father of Winston, was a prominent Conservative MP and Chancellor of the Exchequer in the 1880s. Sir William Crundall, a Conservative and the developer of this street, named it after him. Following war damage, prefabs were erected in 1948. It was stopped up in 1977. When new houses were built for hospital staff off Coombe Valley Road in the 1990s, the new road was named Randolph Road.

Reading Road is off Elms Vale Road. The Marquis of Reading was Lord Warden in 1934 when this road was laid out.

Red Pump Square See Blenheim Square.


Regina Way was off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Reynold’s Court  See Freeman’s Cottages.

Richard’s Lane  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1832.

Rokesley Road is off Melbourne Avenue.  It was built in the 1960s by the council and named after Rokesley Tower in Dover Castle. This was named after the Manor of Roxley near Lenham which was granted to William de Crevequer, Lord of Leeds, by William the Conqueror in return for fighting for the king and providing men to help guard the castle.

Roosevelt Road is off Green Lane, Buckland Estate. It was built after the Second World War and named after the US wartime president.

Round Tower Lane ran from Paradise Street to Oxenden Street. See Round Tower Street for name. Built by 1641, it was demolished in 1913 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Round Tower Passage was near Harbour Station.  See Round Tower Street.

Round Tower Street ran from Oxenden Street to Harbour Station.  The street was built by 1737 and ran parallel with the site of John Clarke’s pier or sea wall, built with towers in Henry VII’s reign. The wall ran from Archcliffe Fort to South Pier Head, making a safe haven for boats that became known as Paradise Pent. The towers are featured in the famous painting depicting Henry VIII embarking for the Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520. Part of one of the towers stood as late as 1813. The street was demolished to make way for the new railway link between the London Chatham and Dover line and the South East Railway line in the late 19th century.

Ruffin’s Court was off Princes Street. Apparently in this court was a room let to the elite of Dover for private theatricals. It was named after Thomas Ruffin, the builder, who was born in 1705. In addition to building, he sold sheep’s trotters and tripe in the town and neighbouring villages. He was also a bell ringer at St. Mary’s and a sexton of the nearby St. Martin’s burial ground. He was immortalised by Lord Byron who asked Thomas to show him the grave of Churchill, the poet. Ruffin replied, ‘He died before my day of sextonship and I had not the digging of his grave’.


Rugby Road connects Manor Road to Folkestone Road. Apparently this short unmade road, containing a few post WWII houses, was so named at the suggestion of a resident from Rugby.

Ruskin Terrace was on the Buckland Estate. This is another of the post Second World War streets and paths in ‘Poets’ Corner’ on the Buckland Estate. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Russell Place ran from Russell Street to Golden Cross Passage. Built in 1838 and named after Lord John Russell, it was closed in 1986.

Russell Place was off Russell Street and takes it name from it.

Russell Street runs from Castle Street to Townwall Street. Built in 1831 when the great Reform Bill was proposed by Lord John Russell who later became Prime Minister. In 1897 it ran from Castle Street to Dolphin Lane only and then became Fector’s Place, but now covers the road to Townwall Street.

Rutland Road is off Glenfield Road. This unadopted road was built at the beginning of the 20th century and was presumably named after the smallest county in England.

Salisbury Road runs from Godwyne Road to Frith Road. Lord Salisbury was Prime Minister three times between 1885 and 1902 and was installed as Lord Warden in 1896. When Dover Castle Estate was laid out by Sir William Crundall this road was named after him. It dates from 1884.

Samson’s (or Sampson’s) Lane is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1780. Named after a Captain Samson, it later also became known as Fifteen Post Lane.

Saxon Street is off Effingham Street. A companion street to adjacent Norman Street, it was built in 1846.

Selborne Terrace, Clarendon Road. Part of Sir William Crundall’s Clarendon Road, he named it after Roundell Palmer QC, Lord Chancellor, who was created Baron Selborne in 1872 when this road was laid out.

Selkirk Road is off Ottawa Crescent, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.


Seven Star Street ran from Council House Street to the King’s Head public house. One of the earliest Pier streets existing by 1737, a public house of the same name was in the street, but there is a story told that a group of Channel pilots, who lived at one end, suggested calling it Pleiades Street after the group of seven stars familiar to all seamen.  Fishermen living at the other end of the street, no doubt thought that this was a bit of a mouthful and decided to call it Seven Star Street. Bavington Jones states that it was previously Fishermen’s Row and even earlier Assher Strete. It was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Shakespeare Road is off Folkestone Road. This steep road had no name until the beginning of the 20th century. Churchill Road, named after the poet and containing Shakespeare Villas was close by as were Milton Villas. Shakespeare was an obvious choice with Shakespeare Cliff  close by.
Sheridan Road is off The Linces, Buckland Estate. Several roads on the Buckland Estate completed in the late 1940s were named after British poets or dramatists.

Ship Lane beside the Ship Hotel ran from Custom House Quay to Strond Street and is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1822.

Shipman’s Way is off Knight’s Way, Buckland Estate. All the roads in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Shooter’s Hill runs from Chapel Hill to George Street.  Could the same builder from SE London, who named nearby Erith Street, also have built this road and named it after the more well known Shooter’s Hill? It dates from 1835, but all the houses are now post Second World War.

Shrubbery Cottages are between Dodd’s Lane and Mangers Place.  The cottages probably took their name from R.V.Coleman’s house nearby, which was built originally in the 18th century, but rebuilt by Mr. Coleman in 1923. Council houses were built in 1925.

Slip Passage ran from Cambridge Road to Northampton Street. This passage led to the slipway built in 1850 in Wellington Dock where ships were repaired. The slipway was rebuilt in 1952 in a revised position by the Harbour Board, it was closed in 1970 and is now under the De Bradelei Wharf car park.


Snargate over the Sluice is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1806. See Union Street.

Snargate Street ran from New Bridge, but now starts at the York Street roundabout to Limekiln Street.

Mary Horsley’s explanation for the name is that it was named after Snar Gate built as part of the town walls in 1370 when the Snar Gate ward of the town already existed. The name may have originated from a snare in the river to trap rubbish before it blocked the river mouth. As the sea receded from the foot of the cliffs the street was extended. The lower part was not developed until after 1606. The seaward side of the street was demolished in 1928/30 for widening and widened again in 1950, 1972 and in 1991 as part of the A20.

South Military Road is off Archcliffe Road (A20). It was built once the 1860s military fortifications on the Western Heights were completed.

South Pier is one of the pierheads of the old harbour. There were many houses listed on South Pier in the 1841 census, but they were demolished to make way for the railway in 1844.

South Road is off Tower Hamlets Road. It was built in 1865. The Dover Working Men’s Institute built the first eight cottages in 1862 as part of an attempt to improve working men’s living conditions. See Tower Hamlets Road

Spencer Road was a path from The Linces to Chaucer Crescent, Buckland Estate. Several roads on the Buckland Estate completed in the late 1940s were named after British poets or dramatists.

Spinners Alley was off Biggin Street.

Spring Gardens was off Peter Street. Built in 1830, the name comes from a chalybeate spring yielding similar water to that found in Ladywell. It was demolished in 1959 to allow Dover Engineering Works to expand.

Spring Place ran from Oxenden Street to Strond Lane. It was laid out on the old Paradise Pent in the Pier District on the site of a spring.

Springfield Road is off Barton Road.  The name is mentioned in 1901 council minutes. Adopted in1902 it was probably named after one of the four Springfields in Britain, unless there were water springs on the site!


Squire’s Way is off Weaver’s Way, Buckland Estate. All the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and this road, although built in 1948, continued the theme.

St. Alphege Road. St. Alphege became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1006.When Canterbury was sacked by the Danes in 1011 he refused to pay a ransom and was murdered. The road was adopted in 1903, but was constructed earlier probably to serve the new Charlton Church built in the 1890s.

St. Andrews Gardens are off Bunker’s Hill. It was built in 1981 on land formerly part of St. Andrew’s vicarage.

St. Andrews Terrace. The name originally applied to the whole of what is now Crabble Avenue, but now only applies to the main terrace of houses. See Crabble Avenue.

St. Bartholomew’s Close was built in a chalk pit in 2000 off Tower Street close to the site of St.Bartholomew’s Church demolished in 1974.

St. Catharine’s Place ran from Bridge Street to Brook Street. This saint was an early Christian martyr who gave her name to the Catherine Wheel because she was tortured on a spike wheel before execution. The street was laid out on the site of the old St. Mary’s Poor House, which was built in 1795 and closed in 1836 when the new workhouse opened in Buckland Bottom. Comprising just seven dwellings and the Wheelwrights’ Arms it was demolished in 1959 to allow Dover Engineering Works to expand.

St. David’s Avenue is off Old Folkestone Road. The Corporation decided to use the names of the patron saints of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland for roads on the post Second World War Aycliffe estate.

St. Edmund’s Walk runs from Biggin Street to Priory Road. This alley was constructed alongside the 13th century chapel when it was exposed by redevelopment and restored in 1968. It was probably a cemetery chapel of the Maison Dieu.

St. George’s Crescent is off St. David’s Avenue. The Corporation decided to use the names of the patron saints of England, Scotland,Wales and Ireland for roads on the post Second World War Aycliffe estate.


St. Giles’ Close is off St. Giles Road. See St. Giles’ Road.

St. Giles’ Road is off Old Folkestone Road. The Corporation decided to use the names of the patron saints of England, Scotland,Wales and Ireland for roads on the post Second World War Aycliffe estate. This road should have been St. Andrews, but, to avoid confusion with St. Andrews Terrace, it was called after St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh.

St. James Lane ran from the old Townwall Street to Dolphin Lane. In St. James’s parish, it existed in 1641, but suffered bomb damage and all its buildings were demolished after the Second World War. Now it exists only as a service road off Russell Street.

St. James Passage ran from St. James Street to Townwall Street.  It suffered bomb damage and was demolished after the Second World War. See St. James Street.

St. James Place ran from St. James Street to Dolphin Lane. It suffered bomb damage and was demolished after the Second World War. See St. James Street.

St. James Street currently (2009) runs only from Russell Street car park across Woolcomber Street to Castle Hill Road. Originally leading to (old) St. James’s Church from the Market Square, it was built before 1291 and had this name from at least the mid 16th century. Before that it may have been called Broad Street. It was the route taken by the stage coaches to Deal before Castle Street was built and was a fashionable part of Dover with some prestigious shops and business houses, some of which were very old. It was widened in 1896. Run down between the wars, it was badly damaged during the Second World War and, except for three surviving properties at the Woolcomber Street end, it was closed in 1958. The area was converted into a large car park in the 1980s and now awaits redevelopment.

St. John’s Place  was off Snargate Street. The name could have derived from an ancient Dover parish, which had an altar in old St. Martin Le Grand Church; alternatively, it could be connected with the Order of St. John of Jerusalem and the ruins of a Knights Templar chapel on the Western Heights. Probably, however, it was named after St. John’s Mariners Church in the Pier District. It was demolished in 1938 as part of a slum clearance programme.


St. John’s Road off Folkestone Road. Built about 1879 on land belonging to Lord Beaumont, a Knight of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, it was intended to continue the road behind Folkestone Road, but the land was acquired for an ordnance store by the government. It was adopted in 1900.

St. John’s Street is mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1781 and was almost certainly named after St. John’s Mariners’ Church in  the Pier District

St. Katherines Place was off Bridge Street on an 1850 map and was probably St. Catharine’s Place.

St. Lawrence Way, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed for redevelopment in 1985.

St. Margaret’s Place was off St. James’s Street. It existed by 1851 and was built in the stone yard of Mr. Youden, a builder, who was also schoolmaster at St. Margaret’s. He gave this row of neat cottages the name of the village.

St. Martin’s Close is off St. Giles’ Road. Having used the names of patron saints for roads on the post Second World War Aycliffe Estate, the patron saint of Dover was added.

St. Martin’s Hill. Built near the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, this stretch of Folkestone Road between Priory Road and Priory Gate Road was developed in 1843.

St. Martin’s Place. Built near the remains of St. Martin’s Priory by 1851, it is the stretch of Priory Road between Effingham Crescent and Norman Street.

St. Martin’s Terrace, High Street. Built in 1844 near the remains of St. Martin’s Priory, it is the terrace of houses (now shops) in the High Street facing the Maison Dieu.

St. Mary’s Passage runs from Cannon Street to Church Street.  Running beside St. Mary’s Church, no explanation for the name is necessary for this old passage.

St. Patrick’s Road is off Old Folkestone Road. The Corporation decided to use the names of the patron saints of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland for roads on the post Second World War Aycliffe estate.


St. Radigund’s Road is off London Road, Buckland. Prior to 1865 the lower part of the present road was called Butcher’s Lane. It leads to St. Radigund’s Abbey, which was built in 1191 and became a farm following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Radegund (520-587) was a princess forced to marry Clotaine, who already had four wives. Following the murder of her brother by Clotaine, she fled and founded a nunnery.

St. Radigund’s Walk is off Bunkers Hill Avenue. It was built in 1997. See St. Radigund’s Road. 
St. Richard’s Walk runs from Old Folkestone Road to St. David’s Avenue.  The Corporation used the names of saints for roads and paths built on the post Second World War Aycliffe Estate.

Stanhope Road is off Barton Road. It was part of William Crundall’s Barton Estate laid out 1890-1900. Stanhope is a well known Kentish name and the earldom of Stanhope was created in 1718. Captain R. H. Stanhope RN was MP for Dover in 1831. The road was adopted in 1939.

Station Approach provides access to Dover Priory Station off Folkestone Road and was presumably built in 1861 when the station was built. 

Stembrook is off Castle Street. It ran originally from Church Place to Castle Street. A large mill at the entrance to this road stemmed the brook, as the river was often called, for many years. However, Stembrook apparently predates the 1790 mill. Before the creation of Castle Street, 1830-1835, and the bridging of the river, carriages crossed the river by way of a ford, which may have ‘stemmed’ the river. It was in this area in medieval times that the river divided into the East and West brooks. Approved for slum clearance before the Second World War, its houses were demolished afterwards. The road was reconstructed 1950/51 from Castle Street to Stembrook car park.

Stembrook Place was off Stembrook. See Stembrook.

Stone’s Passage was off 76 High Street. 


Strond Lane  ran from Oxenden Street to Elizabeth Street. It was one of the streets developed after 1800 on the site of the original Paradise harbour. It was demolished in 1913 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Strond Street faced the Granville Dock.   It is shown as Strande on early maps, meaning beach, dating back to when the sea washed the foot of the cliffs. The line of the street was a channel carrying water from the Great Pent to the harbour entrance to help keep the harbour mouth clear of shingle. The street was certainly built by 1737 but part of the street was demolished in 1860/61 to make way for the railway line. It was taken over by the Harbour Board, closed to the public in 1966 and its buildings demolished to provide more cargo space on Custom House Quay.

Suffolk Gardens are off Elms Park Gardens. Adopted in 1965, the developer must have had a soft spot for this county.

Sweeps Alley appears in a Joe Harman list of Dover streets and may be Sweeps Lane.

Sweeps Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1832 and apparently crossed Fector’s Place according to Bavington Jones.

Taswell Close is off Taswell Street and was built in 1972. See Taswell Street for its name.

Taswell Street is off Maison Dieu Road. It was built on part of the old Maison Dieu Fields, belonging to Captain Taswell and was laid out in 1862.

Tavenor’s Gardens were off Market Lane. In 1642 Samuel Tavenor, grocer, occupied the premises in Market Lane later occupied by Sir Richard Dickeson. Samuel built a small Baptist chapel on one end of his house where he held services and preached. His ground adjoining was used as a burial ground for himself and his congregation. This chapel continued in use until the new chapel was built in Adrian Street in 1820 – now the Unitarian Church. Terry Sutton’s explanation is that Captain Samuel Taverner (spelling seems to vary), a captain of the troop under Cromwell, acquired land here, which had formerly belonged to St.Martin Le Grand, and built his house. Converted by the Baptists, he was imprisoned in the castle for his faith, but when released in 1692 obtained approval for his house to be used as a meeting house for the Baptists. Although he died in 1696, the Baptists continued to meet in the house until 1745.


Tavenor’s Lane. See Tavenor’s Gardens.

Templar Street is off London Road. Hubert de Burgh was a member of the Order of Knights Templar that built a church on the Western Heights. Templar Street was built soon after 1863.

Tennessee Vale was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Texas Way was off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It was demolished in 1965 for redevelopment.

The Butchery was at the bottom of St John Street and is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1788

The Plain see Beach Street.

Thomas’s Lane  is mentioned in the Paving Commissionerrs’ minutes 1780

Thornton’s Lane was off Townwall Street. Providing rear access to some of the premises in Bench Street, in the 19th century it only contained a shop or two and a few cottages. It was originally called Town Wall Lane. Why the name was changed is a mystery, but Terry Sutton suggests that it was possibly named after the first regular minister of St. Mary’s Church appointed in 1549, Revd. Monge Thorton.

Tilley’s Lane  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1786.

Tinker’s Close.  On the sloping ground between the present Laureston Place and Ashen Tree Lane a market was held for centuries to supply the castle garrison. Pedlars and tinkers who frequented the market gave the area its name long after the market ended.


Toronto Close is off Green Lane, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Toronto Way was off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Tower Hamlets Road runs from High Street/London Road to Astor Avenue. The area was formerly known as Charlton Bottom and in 1800 contained only a few shepherds’ huts. A few brickmakers’ cottages followed with one or two shops and four beerhouses. The area was called Tower Hamlets by Steriker Finnis, the owner of brickfields there who built a tower on Priory Hill to supply water – a strange name for somewhere with no buildings compared with the East London thickly populated area. The tower still stands as part of a house. It is also suggested, by Joyce Banks, that the area was so named because every Easter for ten days the Tower Hamlets Volunteers were billeted in St. Bartholomew’s School for local exercises; however, the school was not built until 1880 long after the area was named. The road was formerly Black Horse Lane, named after the inn on the corner of London Road, but became Tower Hamlets Road in 1866 after the bridge over the new railway line was built. Most of the area was developed between 1846 and 1896.

Tower Hamlets Street runs from West Street to South Road. See Tower Hamlets Road.

Tower Hill runs from South to North Road. See Tower Hamlets Road.

Tower Street runs from Tower Hamlets Road to South Road. See Tower Hamlets Road.


Townwall Lane ran from Fishmongers Lane to Townwall Street according to an 1850 map, but an 1872 Ordnance Survey map shows it running from Townwall Street to Woolcomber Street! However, it does not appear in Dover directories, presumably because it contained no residences.

Townwall Passage ran from Townwall Street to St. James’s Street and was demolished after the Second World War.
Townwall Street now runs from York Street roundabout to Douro Place. The old Townwall Street may have followed fairly closely the line of the old town walls, which were on the sea side of the street from Snargate Street to Woolcomber Street. The corporation named this ancient street in 1799, but the walls were pulled down in 1818 with no trace left above ground when houses were built. Some of the material was used to build Kearsney Abbey in 1821. Starting originally from Bench Street, the upper part of the street, known as Townwall Lane, changed its name to Clarence Street when Clarence House was built (named after the Duke of Clarence). Thomas Pattenden, the Dover diarist, lived at No.1 Townwall Street which was built in 1779. John Shipdem’s Round House was also built in this street, which was realigned and made a dual carriageway in the 1960s and widened in 1992 as part of the A20.

Trafalgar Passage (or Steps) run from Priory Hill to Tower Hamlets.The name must commemorate the Battle of Trafalgar of 1805.

Trafalgar Place was at the foot of Priory Hill. This was a row of cottages commemorating the Battle of Trafalgar.

Trevanion Lane ran from Woolcomber Street to Trevanion Street, but was closed in 1959. See Trevanion Street.

Trevanion Place was off off Trevanion Street. See Trevanion Street.

Trevanion Street ran from St. James’s Street to Liverpool Street and dates from at least 1782. John Trevanion was not a Dovorian, but lived here many years, became a Freeman and was MP for Dover from 1774 until 1803. He died in 1810. His town house, Trevanion House, was in this area. For 50 years he maintained at his own expense a school for 50 poor boys in Council House Street. The street was closed in 1959 for redevelopment.

Turn-againe-lane see New Street.

Turnpike Lane see Dolphin Lane.


Turnstile Alley  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1786.

Two Brewers Lane in the Pier District was there in 1832, named after a pub of the same name.

Underdown Road runs from Folkestone Road to Longfield Road. Thomas Underdown was mayor in 1731 and 1733. Vincent Underdown was mayor in 1743 and 1745. The road, therefore, may have been named after the family. A simpler explanation is that the road lies under the downs. The road was adopted in two parts in 1898 and 1901.

Union Road ran from London Road to Dover Union Workhouse. So named in 1865, it led to the Union or Workhouse opened in 1836. It was renamed Coombe Valley Road in 1964.

Union Row joined Military Road and Bowling Green Hill. Built around 1830, it was demolished as part of the slum clearance programme after the Second World War.

Union Street ran from Strond Street to the sea front, but now from the A20 to the sea front. Thomas Digges’ great dam built in 1583 to form the Pent was built upon during the 17th century and was called originally ‘Snargate Street over the sluice’. The name was changed by 1792 when the Union Hotel was built on its NW Corner. During the 18th and 19th centuries it was an important street and included Latham’s bank and warehouses, the York Hotel, the Dover Castle Hotel and the Cumberland Inn. The Amherst Battery was in the NE corner until it was removed in 1844 as part of harbour enlargement. Arnold Braems, who farmed the harbour revenues in Charles I’s time, had warehouses here, used later by Isaac Minet.  By 1906 only one warehouse was left. A swing bridge was opened in 1846 by the Duke of Wellington to allow ships to access the new Wellington Dock built in the old Pent and a branch railway line on to the Prince of Wales Pier was laid through the street in 1902 for the convenience of transatlantic liner passengers.

Upper Road runs from the Deal Road to the Guston boundary. This was Old St. Margaret’s Road.

Vale View Road is off Elms Vale Road. No doubt a magnificent view was afforded from the top of this road before Elms Vale was built up. It was adopted in two parts in 1896 and 1903.


Vancouver Road is off Melbourne Avenue, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Viaduct (The) runs from Limekiln Street to Beach Street. The original viaduct was opened in 1923 and was built to provide easier access to the Western Docks. It was replaced in about 1980.

Victoria Cottages is off 19 High Street. It contains just three small cottages and, when built, was named after the young queen.

Victoria Crescent faces the former Royal Victoria Hospital  in High Street and was built in 1838 opposite his grand house by papermaker W. Dickenson shortly after Queen Victoria came to the throne.

Victoria Park is off Castle Hill. This imposing terrace was laid out in 1864 on land formerly known as Stringer’s Field.

Victoria Row was off 16 High Street. Containing 14 dwellings, it went all the way from High Street to the river and, when built, was named after the young queen. On the 1851 map it is called Victoria Passage.

Victoria Street runs from Erith Street to Coombe Valley Road  and was built in the second half of the 19th century and named after Queen Victoria.

Virginia Walk was from Boston Rise to Georgia Way, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets and paths were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was demolished for redevelopment in 1965.

Walkers Court was off Finnis’s Hill and was demolished in the 1930s.

Walkers Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783 and may be Walker’s Court.

Wall Passage was an old narrow lane running from St. James Street to Townwall Street, named after the proximity to the town wall or possibly because its cottages were built from the town walls’ stone!

Walton’s Lane. Samuel Walton, mayor in 1715, established a timber yard above Paradise Harbour, which was later owned by Robert Finnis and the lane became known as Finnis’s Hill.


Walton’s Row was a lane leading into Crane Street and is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1781 and may be Walton’s Lane - see above.

Washington Close is off Roosevelt Road. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets and paths were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Washington Way was off Roosevelt Road. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets and paths were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It disappeared in redevelopment later in the 20th century.

Water Lane connected Elizabeth Street with the old Harbour Station. This little lane was often flooded by harbour water. Water from a fresh water spring was once channelled along the line of this lane and emptied into the tidal dock at the Crosswall.

Waterloo Crescent is on the sea front. Built in 1834 by the Harbour Board on a shingle bank used as ropewalks by a man named Jell, it was named after the famous battle, bearing in mind that the victor, the Duke of Wellington, was Lord Warden and Chairman of the Harbour Board at the time.

Weaver’s Way is off Friar’s Way. All the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and this road, although built just after the Second World War, continued the theme.

Wellesley Terrace and Road runs from Townwall Street to Marine Parade. The Duke of Wellington’s name was Arthur Wellesley. The terrace, later named Wellesley Road in 1879, was built in 1846 whilst the Duke was Lord Warden and Chairman of the Harbour Board. The terrace was converted into the Grand Hotel in the 1890s and, following war damage, was demolished in 1949. The site is now occupied by The Gateway
.

Wellington Gardens.  These old people’s homes off Sheridan Road are named after the city in New Zealand rather than the Duke of Wellington. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets and paths were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Wellington Lane was an alley that ran from Snargate Street to Northampton Street named after the Duke of Wellington. Wellington Passage may have been one and the same.

Wellington Passage joined Snargate and Northampton Streets. The Wellington Inn was on a corner. Yet another reminder of the famous Duke of Wellington and his connection with Dover. 

Wellington Place is yet another tribute to the Duke of Wellington. It faced Liverpool Terrace.

West Street runs from Tower Street to Tower Hamlets Street and was built in 1865. See Tower Hamlets Road

Westbury Crescent is off Belgrave Road. Built after the Second World War, it took its name from close by Westbury Road.

Westbury Road is off Belgrave Road. The building plots were sold in 1896 and the road was built in 1899. There is a Westbury in Wiltshire, but any connection with Dover is not known.

Western Close is off Citadel Road, Western Heights.  Taking its name from the Western Heights where it is situated, it is one of several roads built in the 1950s to provide houses for Borstal Institution officers.

Whinless Road is off Coombe Valley Road.  This cul de sac, built between the two world wars, takes its name from Whinless Down. Whin is an old name for gorse.

Whitfield Avenue runs from the Buckland Bridge junction. This road, built upon around 1900, soon becomes Green Lane, leading to Whitfield.

Widred Road is a continuation of East Street, Tower Hamlets.


Widred was a king of Kent and was responsible for the building of the original St. Martin’s Church in 691, which was rebuilt by the Normans. He also strengthened the town’s walls and gates of that time. This road was built in 1865. See Tower Hamlets Road.

Wilbraham Place. Described in the 1841 census as ‘next to Bench Street’, it also appears on the 1835 Pier Ward list. Nothing else is known.

Willow Walk ran from Buckland Avenue to Brookfield Place. This was a pleasant path, with willows no doubt, that went down to the river’s edge behind the houses on the north side of Alfred Road.

Winant Way runs from Green Lane to Old Park Hill. John Winant was US ambassador to Britain during the Second World War and his wife visited Dover in 1942. The road was built as part of the post Second World War Buckland Estate.

Winchelsea Road is off Folkestone Road. Built by Mr Parker Ayers in 1866, the estate’s streets were named after George Finch, Lord Winchelsea, who was Lord Warden during Charles II’s reign. It was not so named until 1879.

Winchelsea Street is off Folkestone Road. See Winchelsea Road.

Winchelsea Terrace is off Folkestone Road. See Winchelsea Road.

Winders Row was a row of flint cottages off London Road, Buckland opposite Buckland School.

Winnipeg Close is off Winnipeg Road. Built in 1982 as part of the redevelopment of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the roads were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Winnipeg Road is off Melbourne Avenue. Built as part of the redevelopment of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the roads were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Winnipeg Way was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets and paths were This path