Dover Streets G - M

G-M OF DOVER’S STREETS, ANCIENT AND MODERN
 

Gaol Lane runs from Queen Street to Market Square. It was already called Gaol Lane by 1786, the corporation having bought a house there and converted it into a prison in 1746, following the abandonment of housing prisoners in one of the townwall towers. The gaol in this lane was wrecked by a mob in 1820 but rebuilt and then abandoned in 1834 when the new town prison opened alongside the Maison Dieu. On the old gaol building was an iron rod with four fish that moved when the treadmill was in use.

Gardiner’s Lane ran from Biggin Street to Priory Road. This was the original name of Worthington Street as early as James I’s reign, but became Worthington Lane around 1800.

Gateway (The), access off Wellesley Road. This block of 221 flats dominates the modern sea front and takes the name from Dover being known as the gateway to Europe. They were completed in 1958 and were built on land between Douro Place and Wellesley Road, following demolition of many war damaged houses.

George Square was at the top of Snargate Street where the bench once stood. On the east side was an opening to the Fish Market and on the west the George Tavern. Both tavern and square were presumably named after one of the king Georges.

George Street runs from Shooter’s Hill to Erith Street. Dating from 1838, the builder apparently named this street after his foreman, George Fry. All the houses are now post Second World War.

Georgia Way was off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate. Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. This path was demolished in 1965 as part of   redevelopment.


Glenfield Road runs from Brookfield Road to Winant Way. There is a Glenfield in Leicestershire, but what was the Dover connection? The road was laid out in 1904 by Major Lawes on part of Old Park, which he owned.

Gloster Ropewalk is off South Military Road, Aycliffe.  In Shakespeare’s King Lear the Duke of Gloster asks, ‘Dost thou know Dover?’ Building of the railway from Folkestone in 1844 forced ropemaking under Archcliffe to move above Archcliffe. In the 1920s the Borough Council built 100 cottages on the site to help rehouse people from the Pier District whose homes were demolished as part of a slum clearance programme.

Gloster Way is off South Military Road, Aycliffe. See Gloster Ropewalk. 

Godwyne Close is off Godwyne Road. This is an access road to blocks of flats built post Second World War on the site of Clark’s Nursery. See Godwyne Road.

Godwyne Path is off Monastery Avenue. This is a late 20th century development on the site of the former Castlemount School. See Godwyne Road.

Godwyne Road runs from Maison Dieu Road to Castle Avenue. Godwyne was Earl of Kent in 1057, Governor of Dover Castle and the father of King Harold. The road was laid out in 1870 as part of the Taswell Estate on the medieval Maison Dieu Fields.

Golden Cross Passage ran from St. James’ Street to Russell Place. Named after the inn, it was stopped up in 1986.

Goodfellow Wayis off Dour Street. Built by the council in 1982, it was named after the first Labour mayor of Dover (1945-49), Arthur Goodfellow.

Gorse Hill Road took its name from the adjacent down called Gorse Hill and became part of Crabble Avenue in 1931.


Goschen Road runs from Astor Avenue to Noah’s Ark Road. Built by the council in 1925, it was named after a prominent 19th century Liberal who disagreed with Gladstone over Home Rule for Ireland and later joined the Conservatives. Following war damage, some prefabs were erected in 1948.

Granville Street runs from Bridge Street to Beaconsfield Road. The builder, Mr S Tucker, originally wanted to call it Barton Street, but, when built in 1882, it was named after Lord Granville, Foreign Secretary and Lord Warden from 1863 to 1888.

Great Street or Square was between Bulwark Street and Beach Street. Formerly called Heart’s Row, it existed before 1782 and was just a short thoroughfare in the Pier District and was so wide that it was also known as Great Square. It was demolished in 1913.

Green Lane runs from Whitfield Avenue to Melbourne Road. It was adopted in 1982 and runs from Brookfield Avenue through the Buckland Estate to the town boundary. Presumably its name comes from the green fields that it once passed through.

Grove (The) is a cul de sac off Limes Road.  Originally called Barton Grove, it was built on the site of Barton Farm between 1900 and 1910.

Grubbin’s Lane ran from Bench Street to Adrian Street. Grubbin was apparently the name of the only shop and residence at the end of the street, which already existed in 1754. It was renamed Chapel Lane, since it led from Bench Street to the Unitarian Chapel in Adrian Street when the chapel was built in 1820.

Guilford Lawn ran from Marine Parade to Liverpool Street. Named after the Guilford family, a Lord Guilford of Waldershare was a member of the Harbour Board for many years, including the 1830s when these dwellings were built on Harbour Board land. Andrew de Guldeford was Constable of Dover Castle and Lord Warden in the 14th century. Sir Edward Guldeford held the same posts in the 16th century and the second Earl of Guilford was Lord Warden from 1779 to 1792.


Hamilton Road is off Noah’s Ark Road. Named after the Duke of Hamilton, a prominent Conservative at the time, it was built by the council in 1925.

Hammond Place was part of Liverpool Street and was named after James Hammond, a mayor of Dover and a member of the Harbour Board who died in 1790.

Hardwicke Road is off Maxton Road and is probably named after the first Earl of Hardwick, Lord Chancellor and son of Philip York, a Dover lawyer in 1790. The family home was a five gabled house in Snargate Street where Maritime House now stands. Alternatively, the road could be named after the architect who restored the Maison Dieu and planned Waterloo Crescent. It was adopted in 1898.

Harold Passage  runs from Maison Dieu Road to Laureston Place. This footway was named after King Harold in 1862. It was previously a continuation of Dieu (or Dee) Stone Lane and was widened
when St. James’ New Church was built to give access to the new Taswell Estate.

Harold Street is now in two parts – off Godwyne Road and off Taswell Street. Named after King Harold, son of Godwyn, Earl of Kent, who was killed at the Battle of Hastings, it formed part of the Taswell Estate built by Captain Taswell from 1862 on the old Maison Dieu Fields.

Hart’s Row (sometimes spelt Heart’s) appears on Eldred’s 1641 map and was off Archcliffe Street in the Pier District. Hart is an aold Dover name. It was later named Great Street.

Hartley Street ran from Durham Hill to Cowgate Hill. Around  1800 John Hartley owned the meadows adjoining what became Cowgate Cemetery and built Prospect House in Princes Street where he ran a private school for young gentlemen (later housing the Prince of Wales Sea Training School for many years).  When the area behind Prospect House was built upon, this road took his name. It was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.


Hawkesbury Street now only provides a modern concrete spiral access to Channel View Road. By 1798 the old Paradise harbour was a useless swamp. It was drained and built upon, including this street, running from Elizabeth Street to Limekiln Street, which was named after the Lord Warden and Chairman of the Harbour Board from 1806 to 1829, Lord Hawkesbury, who became Lord Liverpool. It was demolished in 1913 as part of a slum clearance programme.

Heathfield Avenue runs from Nightingale Road to Park Road.  This long road was laid out 1890-1900 by a George Munro and adopted in 1902.

Heights Terrace is off Citadel Crescent, Western Heights. It was built in the 1950s as part of the housing estate for the officers of the Borstal Institution. Herbert Street is a cul de sac off Erith Street.  Built around 1840, it was apparently named after the servant of the developer.

Heritage Gardens is off Laureston Place and was built at the end of the 20th century on the site of the former Castlemount School.

Hewitt Road is a cul de sac at the junction of Crafford Street and Dour Street. It was built in 1980 and named after the baker’s premises that existed on this corner until it was destroyed during the Second World War. This was the family business of Jack Hewitt, a well known 20th century Dovorian, prominent in the Scout and St. John Ambulance movements.

High Street runs from the Maison Dieu to the Tower Hamlets traffic lights. Strictly speaking this is Charlton High Street. It was called Holestreet in 1400 and by 1800 had become Charlton High Road when pleasant houses were built on market gardens on the east side. It was widened in 1899.

Hillside Road runs from Bunker’s Hill to Crabble Avenue. An obvious name for this road built in the ten years after Crabble Athletic Ground was laid out and opened in 1897. It was not adopted until 1931.


Hirst Close is off Peverell Road, Melbourne Avenue.  It was built by the council in the 1960s and named after Hirst Tower in Dover Castle. This, in turn, was named after John de Hirst who was granted Hirst Manor by the Crown in return for a knight’s fee (an obligation to provide men to help guard the castle) .

Hobart Crescent is off Napier Road, Buckland Estate. Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

Hole Street – See High Street.

Hollowood Road is off Poulton Close, part of the Coombe Valley Road industrial estate developed in the second half of the 20th century and named after the wood that previously existed.

Holmestone Road is off Poulton Close and part of the Coombe Valley Road industrial estate developed in the second half of the 20th century. It was named after the wood on the site..

Horsnaill’s Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1786. One of the Paving Commissioners was a Mr Horsnaill.

Hubert Passage runs from St. James’ Street to Castle Hill. Not named after Hubert de Burgh until 1879, it was an ancient steep path to Canons’ or Monks’ Gate at the castle, known as Monks’ or Canons’ Path.

Hubert Terrace existed in 1841 and appears at the foot of Castle Hill Road on an 1851 map but was destroyed apparently when Victoria Park was built in 1864. It was presumably named after Hubert de Burgh.


Hudson Close is off Green Lane, Buckland Estate. Part of the later development of the Estate, it was adopted in 1982. Most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. 
Johannesburg Road is off Melbourne Avenue. Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.

John’s Place was a cul de sac off Trevanion Street containing five dwellings and named after John Trevanion – see Trevanion Street. It was demolished by 1948.

Jubilee Way is the final section of the A2 into the Eastern Docks. This elevated road into the Eastern Docks from the A2 was opened in 1977, the year of Queen Elizabeth’s Silver Jubilee. Its construction relieved the town centre of docks traffic until the construction of the A20 through the town in the 1990s brought it all back!
Kember’s Lane is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1786.

Kemp’s Lane ran from Strond Street to Limekiln Street and is mentioned in 1778 Paving Commissioner’s minutes.

Kentucky Walk was off Winant Way, Buckland Estate.Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. This path between Winant Way and Maine Close was demolished for redevelopment.

Kimberley Close is off Durban Crescent, Buckland Estate. Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the the paths and streets were named after people, towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War.
Kimberley Terrace is the name given to 32 houses in Douglas Road built around 1900 and named after the diamond mining area of South Africa, which was in the news at the time.


Kimberley Walk was on the Buckland Estate off Durban Crescent. Part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate. Most of the paths and streets were named after people, towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. This path between Winant Way and Maine Close was demolished for redevelopment.

Kingly Way see Cow Lane.

King Street runs from the Market Square to Bench Street. Once thought to have been named after Henry VIII who may have stayed in a house in this street, much earlier deeds and charters of the Norman period, however, refer to King’s Street and King’s Lane, possibly indicating that the Crown owned the area at the time. The narrow street was widened in 1829 by pulling down the west side and setting buildings further back.

King’s Head Street in the Pier District was named after the pub in the street thought to have been named after James I. It became Clarence Place later. See Clarence Place.

King’s Lane ran from King Street to Mill Lane in an area owned by Norman kings. It was later renamed Fishmonger’s Lane.

King’s Passage This old alley in the Pier District ran from Seven Star Street to Beach Street by the King’s Head Hotel. 

King’s Road is off Elms Vale Road. The road was being laid out at the time of George V and Queen Mary’s Silver Jubilee. It was not adopted until 1951.

Kings Ropewalk is off King Lear’s Way.  Building of the railway from Folkestone in 1844 forced ropemaking under Archcliffe to move above Archcliffe. In the 1920s the Borough Council built 100 cottages on the site to help rehouse people from the Pier District whose homes were demolished as part of a slum clearance programme.


Kitchener Road is off Elms Vale Road. The Monins family held land in the Elms Vale area for centuries. John Henry Monins lived at Ringwould House when several streets were laid out in this area around 1900. General Kitchener, later Earl Kitchener, was his cousin.

Knights Templars is off Citadel Road, Western Heights. It takes its name from the remains of a Knights Templar church close by, which was discovered in 1806. King John may have met the Papal Legate there. This was part of the housing estate built in the 1950s for officers of the Borstal Institution.

Knight’s Way runs from London Road to Old Park Hill, Buckland Estate.It was built in 1925. All the streets in the Buckland Estate built before the Second World War take their names from characters in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Ladywell joins High Street to Park Place and Park Street. The Well of Our Lady was in this lane and its waters apparently cured sicknesses. ‘Pure Ladywell Water’ was apparently sold in the streets. The well became the town’s first drinking fountain when a pump was added around 1834. A remnant of the well was unearthed in the 1970s. The lane was 14 feet wide in 1839 and little more than a farm track, but it became a cobbled street as part of the development of the Maison Dieu lands. It was widened in 1903 by removing the north side.

Ladywell Place was a cul de sac off Park Place. It was demolished in 1938 in order to build the police station. See Ladywell.

Lamb’s Lane  is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1786.

Lambton Road is off Coombe Valley Road. Lambton was the family name of the Earls of Durham. John Lambton was Lord Privy Seal in 1828 and was created Earl of Durham in 1833. The road wasadopted in 1905 and extended by the council in 1933/34.

Lamper’s Lane was off Biggin Street in 1781. See New Street.


Lancaster Road is off Durham Hill. The Durham Hill area was redeveloped after the Second World War with blocks of flats, which were all named after royal dukes, including Lancaster, which gave its name to this road.

Lascelles Road is off Folkestone Road. It was built in 1901 when part of the Monins Estate. Lascelles is the family name of Lord Harewood (the 6th Lord Harewood married Mary, the Princess Royal, daughter of George V). This Lord Harewood was an army general in the First World War, but what was the Dover connection?

Last Lane ran from Queen Street to Adrian Street.  Perhaps it should be called Lass Lane since there was a pub there called The Lass, which was demolished about 1776. Some think it is named after shoe lasts because of the shoemaking businesses that flourished there from 1710. Yet another theory is that it was the last lane before reaching the medieval town walls. Bavington Jones says that it was once called Bourman’s Lane. It now ends at modern York Street.

Laureston Place is off Castle Hill.  Mr. Fector built Laureston House here. Either the road and house were named after Laureston where Mr. Fector’s wife came from or after her maiden name of Laurie. It is mentioned in the Paving Commissioners’ Minutes 1824.The area was previously called Up Market, possibly a corruption of Tup Market where young rams were sold. A tup was apparently a young ram. Until 1801, it was the only road to Deal.

Leighton Road is off Beaconsfield Road. Dating from 1897, it was laid out on part of the Dover cricket field by W. J. Adcock, a builder who was mayor in 1885 and 1890. He chose to name both this and the adjacent Millais Road after painters who died at the time the roads were built. It was adopted in 1931.

Leyburne Road runs from Taswell Street to Godwyne Road.  Roger de Leyburne was a Lord Warden during Henry III’s reign and his heart is preserved in a heart shrine in Leyburne Church. The road was originally laid out in 1862 as part of the Taswell Estate by W. Adcock, but has since been redeveloped.

Limekiln Lane was off Oxenden Street in the Pier district. See Limekiln Street.


Limekiln Street is now a stretch of the modern A20 between the Snargate Street stretch and the Archcliffe Road stretch. It was previously a continuation of Snargate Street to the old Hawkesbury Street and appears on a map of 1641. Before the street was built limekilns existed at the base of the cliff to burn chalk for lime before exported on ships. As part of a slum clearance programme its south side was demolished in 1923.

Limes Road is off Barton Road. Built on the site of Barton Farm in 1906, I presume it was named after trees in the area.

Linces (The) is off Roosevelt Road, Buckland Estate. It was built after the Second World War and is one of the few roads on the Buckland Estate with a local name. Land in this area was called the Linces. Apparently Hlinc in Anglo-Saxon was a hill and a lynchet a strip of grassland between cultivated fields.

Lion Court was off Oxenden Street and was probably named after a hostelry. See Oxenden Street.

Lister Close is off St. Radigund’s Road.  It is named after Charles Lister House (sheltered housing) to which it gives access and was built in 1983. Charles Lister was Mayor of Folkestone 1949/50. His connection with this development may be the Royal British Legion that built it.

Liverpool Court was off Water Lane. See Liverpool Street and Water Lane.

 

The Mote Bulwark

   Liverpool Street:  Mote Bulwark and pissoir
The Mote Bulwark on the cliff face below Dover Castle (top) and what is believed to be an army drill hall being built off what is now Townwall Street, before the Second World War. An unusual feature of the picture is the small structure, bottom left. This appears to be a French style pissoir (wc.)  This was not far from another pissoir, of different design, near to Old St James Church and the junction of Woolcomber Street and Maison Dieu Road, until just after the Second World War. 
That once well known feature was destroyed by Council workmen, inspite of efforts to preserve it. The explanation apparently being that these men pulled down the wrong urinal!   A keen eye may also spot another feature -- a line of towels hanging up to dry. These are believed to be connected with the adjoining beach huts shown in their winter storage yard.
Liverpool Street ran from Trevanion street to Wellesley Road.  Formerly a promenade called Orange Walk and possibly named after William of Orange whose fleet was off Dover in 1688, the street was built in 1817 across what had been a tidal lagoon between two shingle ridges. It gradually silted up and was then filled in. Until Marine Parade was built it enjoyed sea views. It was named after the then Lord Warden and Chairman of the Harbour Board, Lord Liverpool, who was also Prime Minister from 1812 to 1827.

Liverpool Terrace was named after the Prime Minister and Chairman of The Harbour Board and was part of Liverpool Street.

London Road runs from High Street to Crabble Hill. Dating from around 1680, there were only a few houses until William Kingsford bought the Bartholomew Lands in 1810. It was originally called Buckland Street from Beaconsfield Road. Several fine residences were built between then and 1845. It was the turnpike road to Canterbury and London with the toll gate on Crabble Hill.


Long Wall ran from The Bench to the Old Guard House and was paved in 1781. It evolved from the long wall built one side of the Pent (later Wellington Dock) by Thomas Digges and was demolished in 1814.

Longfield Road is off Belgrave Road. Built in about 1880, it was adopted in 1898 and was probably named after a meadow that existed there. Further on, behind Maxton and Farthingloe, the hill is known as Long Hill.

Lord Warden Square is at the seaward end of the Viaduct. The Lord Warden Hotel was built by the South Eastern Railway Company in 1851 and the road encircling it was named accordingly.

Lorne Road runs from Buckland Avenue to London Road. The Marquis of Lorne was MP for Dover from 1762 to 1766 when he became Baron Sundridge. The lane was so called on an 1850 map. There was a Lorne Villa in London Road before the Lorne Road houses were built on the lane across Brook Ditch meadow in 1900.

Love Lane was named for obvious reasons.Widened between 1883 and 1885, it was renamed Frith Road and Connaught Road.

Lower Row ran from Durham Hill to Bowling Green Lane. Built early in the 19th century, it was part of the slum clearance programme in the 1930s.

Lowther Road runs from South Road to Goschen Road. Built by 1900 and named after a Thanet Conservative MP, it was adopted in 1906.

Luke’s Close off Bunker’s Hill Avenue. Built in 1997 by the Samuel Lewis Housing Trust, it was to be called Preston Close, but this was rejected and Luke’s Close was approved in 1994.

Macdonald Road is off Coombe Valley Road. The road was laid out at the beginning of the 20th century and was named after a Boer War general. It was extended by the council in 1933/34.

Magdala Road runs from St. Radigund’s Road to Coombe Valley Road. It was laid out on a former brickfield in 1868 soon after the Abyssinian War when General Lord Napier distinguished himself and was given the title of Magdala.


Maine Close is off Winant Way, Buckland Estate. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of  the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. Maine Crescent was closed in 1967 for redevelopment and Maine Close replaced it.

Maine Crescent was off Green Lane, Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that the Commonwealth and the US played during the War. It was closed in 1967 for redevelopment.

Maison Dieu Place is off High Street. Built on part of Wood’s Meadow in the 1860s, facing the side of the Victoria Hospital, it took its name from the medieval building close by.

Maison Dieu Road runs from Charlton Green to Woolcomber Street. The road was built through Maison Dieu Fields, part of Maison Dieu Park, which in turn belonged to the Maison Dieu before the Dissolution. Prior to 1862, when it was properly laid out, it was a cart track that led to Barton Farm called either ‘Back of Charlton’, ‘Charlton Back Lane’ or ‘Back of Barton’. By 1866 it was lined with imposing villas.

Malmains Road is off Folkestone Road. It was built around 1900 as part of the Monins Estate. The Malmains family owned many manors in East Kent including Lenacre Court at Whitfield, having originally accompanied William the Conqueror from Normandy. A William de Malmains was buried in St. Radigund’s Abbey in 1224.

Malvern Road runs from Folkestone Road to Clarendon Road.  Part of Sir William Crundall’s Clarendon Estate, it was built 1875/78 and was possibly named after a Conservative politician of the time rather than the town.

Manger’s Lane and Place off Crabble Hill. Several Mangers lived in Dover during the 18th century and may have owned property in this area. These streets were adopted in 1974, but existed by 1850.

Manor Rise runs from Manor Road to Mount Road. Taking its name from Maxton Manor, it was built between the Wars and was adopted in 1958.


Manor Road is off Approach Road. It takes its name from Maxton Manor, which can be traced back to the reign of Henry III when it was held by Sir Stephen Manekyn from the king in return for providing knights’ service in the defence of Dover Castle. A Maxton manor house was lived in by the Worthington family in the 19th century and was only demolished after the Second World War.The road was laid out early in the 19th century, adopted in 1922 and extended in 1933.

Maresfield Close is off Mayfield Avenue. It was built in the 1990s. Several roads in this locality take their names from Sussex towns or villages.

Marine Parade is part of the sea front. Prior to building in 1820, this sea front walk was a waste of shingle with sheds, herring hangs, boat houses and a whitening factory where dogs turned wheels to grind the material.

Marine Place ran from Marine Parade to Liverpool Street. Developed early in the 19th century, it fell victim of war damage and post war redevelopment.
Mariners’ Court was off Commercial Quay. This was a small opening when the Commercial Quay was lined with properties. Both disappeared after the First World War for dock expansion.

Marjan Close is off St. Radigund’s Road. It was built in 1993. Dover is twinned with Split in Croatia and in 1993 the Mayor of Split visited Dover. To repay the compliment of Split naming one of its roads Dover Street, Dover wished to call its new close after Split, but Split Close was not attractive; therefore, it was called Marjan after a hill in Split with cultural significance.

Market Court was off Market Street. It was demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Market Lane  ran from Market Square to Queen Street.  Formerly part of the precincts of St. Martin Le Grand church, it led to the Market Square. A tallow chandler and grocer traded in this lane from at least the 1500s.During the 19th century John Usborne owned the business and took Richard Dickeson into partnership. By the 1850s the firm was known as Dickeson and Wood and by the 1870s Dickeson was the sole owner. His company supplied the entire British army with blanco and had depots all over the country.  Dickeson became one of Dover’s richest men and founded the Swimming Club, the Rowing Club, the Cycling Club and several other Dover organisations. In 1880 to celebrate the centenary of Sunday School he gave a party for 5,184 children and 1,000 teachers and a commemorative mug for each child.


Market Place and Square is between King Street and Cannon Street. St. Martin’s Fair was held annually from about 1160 in the grounds of St. Martin Le Grand’s Church, but deteriorated into ‘riotousness and drunkenness’. Unsuccessful attempts were made in 1743 and 1748 to stop the fair, which ceased eventually in 1847. An open air market was held in the Square until 1988.The present Market Square, previously called Market Place, dates from 1480 when a new Market Cross was erected. Market days were held weekly. From 1605 until 1861 there was a Court Hall or Guildhall in the Market Place with an open ground floor where stall holders operated on market days with a council chamber above supported on grotesquely carved wooden pillars. This was also the site of the town’s instruments of punishment: the stocks, cage, whipping post and pillory.

Market Street ran from Market Square to Princes Street. Apparently this road once connected the Market Place with St. Martin’s Gate when the town walls existed. On one side of the street was the church of St Martin Le Grand. Whilst the street name still exists, the area is grass covered with Roman remains below.

Markland Road is off Church Road. Originally called St.Martin’s Road when the school was virtually the only building, the name was changed to Markland in about 1906, following housing development, to avoid confusion with other streets using St. Martin’s name. It was not adopted until 1938.The Eaton family were prominent Dover merchants in the 18th century. There is a large memorial in St. Mary’s Church to Peter Eaton, who died in 1769, which was erected by Mrs Hannah Markland, his cousin and heir.

Marlborough Road is a cul de sac off Reading Road. Built in 1966, it was named either after the Duke of Marlborough or, more probably, after the town of Marlborough.

Marlowe Road is on the Buckland Estate. Several roads on the Buckland Estate completed in the late 1940s were named after British poets and dramatists.

Masons Road is a cul de sac off Coombe Valley Road. Adopted in 1961, it first appeared in Dover directories in the 1930s.

Matthew’s Place is a cul de sac off Bridge Street. One of the streets on the north side of Bridge Street rebuilt in the middle of the 19th century, it was probably named after Alfred Matthews who built many of the houses in Godwyne Road and elsewhere; alternatively, it could have been named after Saint Matthew.


Maxton Road is off Folkestone Road. It takes its name from Maxton Manor. In the 13th century William Archer was Lord of the Manor and the chief master mariner of the 21 Dover master mariners required to supply ships for the King’s service as part of the Cinque Ports’ obligations. The road was adopted in 1898.

Mayfield Avenue is off Nightingale Road.  Part of William Crundall’s Barton Estate laid out 1890-1900, it was adopted in 1902. Like adjacent roads, it was named after a place in Sussex.

Mayfield Gardens is a cul de sac off Mayfield Avenue.  The houses date from 1900 or somewhat earlier, but the road was not adopted until 1963.
Melbourne Avenue is off Green Lane, Buckland Estate. It forms part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War.

Michigan Crescent was off Winant Way, Buckland Estat. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It was closed for redevelopment when houses replaced prefabs.

Middle Row ran from Blenheim Square to Seven Star Street. It was one of the earlier Pier district streets, existing before 1737. There were three little streets running parallel to each other in the Pier District and this was the middle one. All three disappeared as part of the Pier District improvement scheme after the First World War.

Military Road now runs from Lancaster Road to South Military Road. It was constructed by the military before 1831 from the old York Street to give access to the fortifications on the Western Heights. Houses were soon built upon it up to the Christ Church schools, built in 1847, as well as side roads such as Union Row, Blucher Street and part of Mount Pleasant. It was adopted in 1893 and conveyed from the War Department to the Corporation in 1955. With the building of the York Street dual carriageway in the 1970s the road was shortened.

Mill Lane runs from Townwall Street to Fishmongers Lane. It was bounded on one side by the old Town Mill, which dated from the 12th century and was rebuilt in 1803, ceased milling in 1899 and was demolished in 1953. Dwellings in the lane were demolished during the 1930s as part of a slum clearance programme.

Millais Road is off Beaconsfield Road. Dating from 1897, it was named by the builder W. J. Adcock after the famous painter and adopted in 1906.


Milton Close and Milton Road are both off The Linces, Buckland Estate. Several roads on the Buckland Estate, completed in the late 1940s, were named after British poets.

Minerva Avenue runs from Barton Road to Mayfield Avenue. Why this avenue, part of William Crundall’s Barton Estate laid out 1890-1900, was named after a Roman goddess is a mystery. It was adopted in 1902.

Monastery Avenue is off Godwyne Road. Built in 2002 on part of the Castlemount site, which at one time was occupied by a religious order.

Monins Road is off Elms Vale Road. A John Monins was mayor of Dover in 1372. John Monins was Lieutenant Governor of Dover Castle and held land in the area, some of which in the Elms Vale area remained in the family until developed for housing at the beginning of the 20th century. It was adopted in 1902.

Monk’s Way is off Parson’s Way, Buckland Estate. Although not built until just after the Second World War, like other streets on the Buckland Estate built before 1939, it was named after a character in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

Montreal Close is off Melbourne Avenue. It is part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. It was adopted in 1982.

Montreal Way was on the Buckland Estate. It was part of the post Second World War Buckland Housing Estate, where most of the paths and streets were named after towns or locations in the Commonwealth or the United States, emphasising the role that they played during the War. This path was closed in 1985 for redevelopment.

Mount Pleasant ran from Military Road to Hartley Street. Filled with very modest houses, this was the highest road across the hill between Cowgate Hill and Military Hill. Before the area was developed at the beginning of the 19th century it provided very pleasant walks and views. It was demolished as part of a slum clearance programme during the 1930s.

Mount Road is off Maxton Road. It was adopted in 1959 and was probably named because of the climb to reach it from Folkestone Road.


Mr Fector’s Lane, mentioned in Paving Commissioners’ minutes 1783, was behind banker Peter Fector’s house in Strond Street.

Museum Lane ran from Queen Street to the Market Place close by the Museum. In the 19th century the fishmarket and shambles was on one side.

Source by kind permission Derek Leach from his book ' Streets of Dover'